Computer Science - College Majors

Computer Science

It's amazing how technology has evolved over the years. From checking Facebook on our mobile phones to the development of new computer programs that help us with everyday tasks, computer science majors are the ones to thank for the advanced world of technology we live in.

Computer science majors study how computers process, store and solve information. Your studies will span from theorems and algorithms to computer architecture. Computer science is an expanding major with new developing programs to learn about.

Abstract and logical thinking are important with a computer science major, so along with math and science skills, you'll need to think outside the box. You'll be learning how to solve problems dealing with or about computers, so analytical skills are a must.

Something to consider

Computer science can take longer than the typical four year undergraduate program, due to the major's competitive nature and growing popularity. In addition, computer science majors should focus on creating a portfolio, not a resume, to show their programing knowledge and ability. Portfolios are the most common way to showcase projects and code to future employers.

After graduation

There is a lot of variety in careers a computer science major could have, including: computer and information research scientists, computer game designer, artificial intelligence network engineer, Java developer, computer graphics, computer network architects, computer programmers, software or systems engineer, computer systems analysts and software/web developers. Positions, such as a computer and information research scientist, will require a Ph.D.

Where you could end up living

According to My Next Move, in 2013 there are 17 states with average to above-average career opportunities in the computer and information research scientist field, including: California, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maryland, New Mexico, Utah and Virginia. A major headquarter for technology companies and careers is Silicon Valley, located south of the San Francisco Bay Area in California.

Salary and occupation outlook

According to the U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2016, the average salary for computer and information research scientists was $109,260 per year, with more than 24,000 people employed in that job title. The projected outlook in the field is a 15 percent growth rate from 2012 to 2022, which is faster than the average for all occupations. One of the factors of this increase is the new technologies and software being developed that create new jobs.

While in school, you'll learn how to develop computer software, gain programming knowledge and build web pages. Working with your fellow students on projects will help you gain leadership skills and learn how the computer science industry works.

Did You Know?

Visit our Free Scholarship Search to find college scholarships for computer science majors.

Sources:
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/computer-and-information-research-scientists.htm
http://www.mynextmove.org/profile/state/15-1111.00?from=profile
http://news.dice.com/2012/04/02/five-realities-to-consider-for-a-computer-science-degree/
http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes151111.htm
http://www.cs.mtu.edu/~john/whatiscs.html